Course Guide

Please visit explorecourses.stanford.edu for a full list of courses and scheduling. You can find course syllabi at syllabus.stanford.edu.

Essential Introductory Courses

If you are looking for an introduction to the Graduate School of Education, check out these courses. Educ 100 is a 1-unit course hosted by EAST House that exposes students to a variety of education scholars at Stanford. Educ 101 is a 4-unit course taught by Jennifer Wolf, Director of the Undergraduate Minor in Education and an exemplary teacher.

EDUC 100A, B, C: EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, research and practice pertaining to sex, gender, and education are presented by professionals and scholars. In the spring, the seminar revolves around race, ethnicity, and higher education with a particular emphasis on Asian American issues. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice.

EDUC 101: Introduction to Teaching and Learning

This course is designed to help undergraduates explore career interests in education; it is the core course for the Undergraduate Minor in Education, and fulfills requirements for Honors in Education. The course considers the philosophy, history, politics, professional practice and social structures of teaching in the United States. Students will read and discuss teaching theory and research, participate in learning activities and visit school teaching sites, as well as examine and analyze artifacts and models of teaching.

Introductory Seminars

Intro Sems, sponsored by VPUE Stanford Introductory Studies, offer small-group courses taught by esteemed faculty to freshmen and sophomores; however, sometimes juniors and seniors are welcome as well. Intro Sems change year to year, and students are required to apply in advance. If a seminar doesn't fill up by the start of the quarter, students are often welcome to join without applying.

EDUC 114N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, CSRE 14N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.

EDUC 115N: How to Learn Mathematics

What is going on in mathematics education in the United States? Why do so many people hate and fear math? What contributes to the high levels of innumeracy in the general population? Why do girls and women opt out of math when they get a chance? In this seminar we will consider seminal research on math learning in K-12 classrooms, including a focus on equity. We will spend time investigating cases of teaching and learning, through watching videos and visiting schools. This seminar is for those who are interested in education, and who would like to learn about ways to help students (and maybe yourselves?) learn and enjoy mathematics. If you have had bad math experiences and would like to understand them ¿ and put them behind you ¿ this seminar will be particularly good for you. The final project for this class will involve developing a case of one or more math learners, investigating their journeys in the world of math.

EDUC 116N: Howard Zinn and the Quest for Historical Truth (HISTORY 116N)

With more than two million copies in print, Howard Zinn¿s A People's History is a cultural icon. We will use Zinn’s book to probe how we determine what was true in the past. A People's History will be our point of departure, but our journey will visit a variety of historical trouble spots: debates about whether the US was founded as a Christian nation, Holocaust denial, and the "Birther" controversy of President Obama.

Service-Learning Courses

Service-Learning Courses are certified by the Stanford Haas Center for Public Service. These courses are offered by a wide range of academic departments each quarter and give Stanford students an opportunity to provide direct service to local schools, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies. Other courses allow students already engaged in service to enhance the effectiveness of their service, or provide a theoretical framework or academic skills essential in preparation for public service fieldwork and internships.

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).

EDUC 117: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 417)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).

EDUC 171: Early Childhood Education Practicum

Restricted to students who participate in a service learning program focused on early math learning. Training for activities in preschool classrooms. Focus is on the teaching of math to young children, but also includes background on issues related to young children's cognitive, language, and social development; classroom management; cultural diversity; and early childhood education programs. May be repeated for credit.

EDUC 177A, B, C: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.

Education and Society

EDUC 110: Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools (EDUC 310, SOC 132, SOC 332)

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.

EDUC 112X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 212X, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.

EDUC 120C: Education and Society (EDUC 220C, SOC 130, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.

Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in Education

EDUC 100B, C: EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In winter quarter, research and practice pertaining to sex, gender, and education are presented by professionals and scholars. In the spring, the seminar revolves around race, ethnicity, and higher education with a particular emphasis on Asian American issues. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice.

EDUC 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.

EDUC 197: Education, Gender, and Development (FEMGEN 297, SOC 134)

Theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to the role of education in changing, modifying, or reproducing structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Cross-national research on the status of girls and women and the role of development organizations and processes.

EDUC 216: Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-1990 (AFRICAAM 116, CSRE 216X, HISTORY 255E)

Seminar. The relationship among race, power, inequality, and education from the 1880s to the 1990s. How schools have constructed race, the politics of school desegregation, and ties between education and the late 20th-century urban crisis.

EDUC 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, CSRE 245)

African American, Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American racial and ethnic identity development; the influence of social, political and psychological forces in shaping the experience of people of color in the U.S. The importance of race in relationship to social identity variables including gender, class, and occupational, generational, and regional identifications. Bi- and multiracial identity status, and types of white racial consciousness.

Immigration and Education

EDUC 177A, B, C: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.

EDUC 277: Education of Immigrant Students: Psychological Perspectives

Historical and contemporary approaches to educating immigrant students. Case study approach focuses on urban centers to demonstrate how stressed urban educational agencies serve immigrants and native-born U.S. students when confronted with overcrowded classrooms, controversy over curriculum, current school reform movements, and government policies regarding equal educational opportunity. (SSPEP)

Bilingualism and Education

EDUC 114N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, CSRE 14N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.

EDUC 149: Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism (EDUC 249)

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.

EDUC 183X: Practicum in English-Spanish School & Community Interpreting (CHILATST 183X, EDUC 283X)

This practicum will assist students in developing a set of skills in English-Spanish interpreting that will prepare them to provide interpretation services in school and community settings. The course will build students' abilities to transfer intended meanings between two or more monolingual individuals of who are physically present in a school or community setting and who must communicate with each other for professional (and personal) purposes.

EDUC 330X: Teaching English Language Learners: Issues in Policy, Leadership, and Instruction

Current perspectives and research on issues facing educators serving the English language learner population. Issues include federal education legislation, civil rights law, national Common Core Standards, content and language proficiency standards assessment and accountability, school improvement models, school structure, community engagement, addressing issues of long-term English learners, programming for newcomer ELLs, early childhood education, and promoting bilingualism.

EDUC 419X: Academic Achievement of Language Minority Students

Emphasis is on the current state of knowledge in the research literature and comparisons to students' experiences and observations in bilingual education, English as a second language, reading instruction, cultural issues in education, and research methods.

Literacy and Education

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).

EDUC 111: The Young Adult Novel: A Literature For and About Adolescents

For undergraduates considering teaching or working with adolescents, and for those planning to apply to the coterminal program in the Stanford Teacher Education program (STEP). Students work together to define the genre of young adult novels. What they reveal about adolescence in America. How to read and teach young adult literature.

EDUC 258: Literacy Development and Instruction

Literacy acquisition as a developmental and educational process. Problems that may be encountered as children learn to read. How to disentangle home, community, and school instruction from development.

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education

EDUC 139X: Educating Young STEM Thinkers (EDUC 239X, ME 139, ME 231)

The course will introduce students to the design thinking process, the national conversations about the future of STEM careers, and provide opportunities to work with middle school students and K-12 teachers in STEM-based after-school activities and intercession camps. The course will be both theory and practice focused. The purpose is twofold; to provide reflection and mentoring opportunities for students to learn about pathways to STEM careers and to introduce mentoring opportunities with young STEM thinkers.

EDUC 280X: Learning & Teaching of Science (PHYSICS 295)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.

EDUC 332: Theory and Practice of Environmental Education

Foundational understanding of the history, theoretical underpinnings, and practice of environmental education as a tool for addressing today's pressing environmental issues. The purpose, design, and implementation of environmental education in formal and nonformal settings with youth and adult audiences. Field trip and community-based project offer opportunities for experiencing and engaging with environmental education initiatives.

EDUC 357: Science and Environmental Education in Informal Contexts

There are ever-expanding opportunities to learn science in contexts outside the formal classroom, in settings such as zoos, museums, and science centers. How are issues around science and the environment presented in these contexts, how do people behave and learn in these contexts, and what messages do they take away? This course will cover the learning theories and empirical research that has been conducted in these settings. Case studies of nearby science centers will add an experiential dimension.

EARTHSCI 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction.

ENGR 313: Topics in Engineering and Science Education

This seminar series focuses on teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses based on education research. Each year focuses on a different topic related to STEM education. This course may be repeated for credit each year.This year we will focus on active learning techniques for STEM courses. Specific topics that will likely be covered include: problem-based learning, flipped classrooms, leading effective discussions, group work, peer evaluation, and concept mapping. Throughout the quarter, there will be several opportunities for directly practicing and/or analyzing the methods from STEM education literature.

Learning and Psychological Development

EDUC 261: Sociocultural Theories of Learning & Development: Vygotksy & Bakhtin

Grounded in theories of Vygotsky and Bakhtin, this course will review commonly used, but often misunderstood, concepts about how context enters theories of learning and development. Topics will include: distinctions between development and learning; the place of culture in developing higher mental functions; the zone of proximal development, conceptions and misconceptions; contributions of activity theory; importance of heterogeneity and multivocality; and role of language in ¿ideological becoming¿ or idea development. Focus will be on using theory to guide research.

EDUC 256: Psychological and Educational Resilience Among Children and Youth (HUMBIO 149)

Theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to the psychological and educational resilience of children and adolescents. Overview of the resilience framework, including current terminology and conceptual and measurement issues. Adaptive systems that enable some children to achieve successful adaptation despite high levels of adversity exposure. How resilience can be studied across multiple levels of analysis, ranging from cell to society. Individual, family, school, and community risk and protective factors that influence children's development and adaptation. Intervention programs designed to foster resilient adaptation in disadvantaged children's populations.

EDUC 342: Child Development and New Technologies

Focus is on the experiences computing technologies afford children and how these experiences might influence development. Sociocultural theories of development as a conceptual framework for understanding how computing technologies interact with the social ecology of the child and how children actively use technology to meet their own goals. Emphasis is on influences of interactive technology on cognitive development, identity, and social development equity.

EDUC 367: Cultural Psychology

(Formerly 292.) The relationship between culture and psychological processes; how culture becomes an integral part of cognitive, social, and moral development. Both historical and contemporary treatments of cultural psychology, including deficit models, crosscultural psychology, ecological niches, culturally specific versus universal development, sociocultural frameworks, and minority child development. The role of race and power in research on cultural psychology.

EDUC 368: Cognitive Development in Childhood and Adolescence

This course aims to broaden and deepen students' understanding of cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. It will examine various theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to different domains of cognitive development, such as neurobiological plasticity, infant cognition, theory of mind, memory, language, and executive functions. Throughout the course, as we survey research findings, we will discuss (1) methods that researchers have employed in their study of cognitive development; (2) limitations of current research and directions for future research; and (3) translation of research findings for practitioners and policymakers.

History of Education

EDUC 165: History of Higher Education in the U.S. (AMSTUD 165, EDUC 265, HISTORY 158C)

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.

EDUC 201: History of Education in the United States (AMSTUD 201, HISTORY 158B)

How education came to its current forms and functions, from the colonial experience to the present. Focus is on the 19th-century invention of the common school system, 20th-century emergence of progressive education reform, and the developments since WW II. The role of gender and race, the development of the high school and university, and school organization, curriculum, and teaching.

EDUC 220D: History of School Reform: Origins, Policies, Outcomes, and Explanations (HISTORY 258E)

Required for students in the POLS M.A. program; others welcome. Focus is on 20th-century U.S. Intended and unintended patterns in school change; the paradox of reform that schools are often reforming but never seem to change much; rhetorics of reform and factors that inhibit change. Case studies emphasize the American high school. This course is required for POLS students pursuing the PreK-12 concentration.

Philosophy and Ethics of Teaching

EDUC 204: Introduction to Philosophy of Education (PHIL 231)

How to think philosophically about educational problems. Recent influential scholarship in philosophy of education. No previous study in philosophy required.

EDUC 269X: The Ethics in Teaching

Goal is to prepare for the ethical problems teachers confront in their professional lives. Skills of ethical reasoning, familiarity with ethical concepts, and how to apply these skills and concepts in the analysis of case studies. Topics: ethical responsibility in teaching, freedom of speech and academic freedom, equality and difference, indoctrination, and the teaching of values.

Higher Education

EDUC 355X: Higher Education and Society

For undergraduates and graduate students interested in what colleges and universities do, and what society expects of them. The relationship between higher education and society in the U.S. from a sociological perspective. The nature of reform and conflict in colleges and universities, and tensions in the design of higher education systems and organizations.

EDUC 117: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 417)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).

EDUC 382: Student Development and the Study of College Impact

The philosophies, theories, and methods that undergird most research in higher education. How college affects students. Student development theories, models of college impact, and issues surrounding data collection, national databases, and secondary data analysis.

International Education

EDUC 136: World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 306D, SOC 231)

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.